One Organization’s Seed Money Is Helping Grow Many Non-Profits

 

Two years ago, as JDSA was just getting started, we stumbled upon an organization called, Pollination Project.

Their mission: Make seed grants possible for individuals looking to make social change.

They do this, not only by making a thousand-dollar donation for those seeking to spread compassion and change throughout their communities and the world…they do it everyday.

$1,000 a day…every day.

That’s 365 grants a year – all over the world.

“One of the challenges with the way philanthropy is currently being done is there’s such a disconnect between the givers and those who are benefiting from the work.” says Ari Nessel, Pollination’s founder.

The $1,000 impact grant jumpstarted our organization, inspired us, and changed our lives.  And we’re not alone.  Hundreds of others like Raghu Makwan, of India.  Who, despite being paralyzed by polio, used his $1,000 to find ways to deliver meals to people needier than him.  Kazu Haga started a movement to train prisoners and at-risk students to embrace nonviolence.  In California, 88-year-old Celia Zaentz used her $1,000 to support community agriculture, and is now teaching kids how to grow vegetables and fruits.  And thirteen-year-old Harley Helman (shown in the CBS story above) spent years collecting blankets, food and toys to donate to animal shelters around Cleveland, then used her impact grant to turn her charity, Blankets Fur Beasties into a tax-exempt non-profit.

For many nonprofits – us included – Pollination Project was the difference between moving ahead and not moving at all.

To learn more about Pollination Project click the links below:

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