Central Floridian’s Help Bring Courage Door-to-Door

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More than a thousand volunteers joined Harbor House this past weekend for the 5th annual It Takes Courage event.  Fanning out across Central Florida, the volunteers split into small groups, hanging door tags with life saving information and resources on domestic violence.

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Partnering with the City of Orlando, Orlando Police Department, the Orange County Sheriff’s Office, and the Orange County Clerk of Courts, volunteers focused their efforts on those communities with the highest incidents of domestic abuse.  In just under three hours, 24,000 homes had been reached.

This year, for the first time, the event was simulcast live between Valencia College http://valenciacollege.edu and The University of Central Florida http://www.ucf.edu, where a team from the volunteer UCF Domestic Violence Awareness group visited several dorms, sororities, and fraternities on campus.

“This event saves lives!”  Carol Wick, CEO of Harbor House, said to the hundreds of volunteers who gathered on the Valencia College campus just before the event kicked off.

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Last year, within two days of distributing over 20,000 door hangers, Harbor House saw a 200% increase in hotline calls and helped file 66 injunctions for protection.  Not only have injunction filings increased by 10 percent in Orange County, but domestic-related murders are down 50% from last year.

To learn more about Harbor House click here: http://www.harborhousefl.com

Interested in volunteering? http://www.harborhousefl.com/volunteer/

If you are in danger or wish to speak with an advocate, please click on the link below: http://www.harborhousefl.com/for-yourself/

Hundreds of volunteers gather on the campus of Valencia College

One Organization’s Seed Money Is Helping Grow Many Non-Profits

 

Two years ago, as JDSA was just getting started, we stumbled upon an organization called, Pollination Project.

Their mission: Make seed grants possible for individuals looking to make social change.

They do this, not only by making a thousand-dollar donation for those seeking to spread compassion and change throughout their communities and the world…they do it everyday.

$1,000 a day…every day.

That’s 365 grants a year – all over the world.

“One of the challenges with the way philanthropy is currently being done is there’s such a disconnect between the givers and those who are benefiting from the work.” says Ari Nessel, Pollination’s founder.

The $1,000 impact grant jumpstarted our organization, inspired us, and changed our lives.  And we’re not alone.  Hundreds of others like Raghu Makwan, of India.  Who, despite being paralyzed by polio, used his $1,000 to find ways to deliver meals to people needier than him.  Kazu Haga started a movement to train prisoners and at-risk students to embrace nonviolence.  In California, 88-year-old Celia Zaentz used her $1,000 to support community agriculture, and is now teaching kids how to grow vegetables and fruits.  And thirteen-year-old Harley Helman (shown in the CBS story above) spent years collecting blankets, food and toys to donate to animal shelters around Cleveland, then used her impact grant to turn her charity, Blankets Fur Beasties into a tax-exempt non-profit.

For many nonprofits – us included – Pollination Project was the difference between moving ahead and not moving at all.

To learn more about Pollination Project click the links below:

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